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I’ve always liked the ranger class, as presented in OD&D and later AD&D 1st edition. But certain aspects of the class, most notably the spell abilities at later levels, didn’t appeal to me. I was looking for a more down-to-earth, plain version of the outdoor survivalist, huntsman and woodland protector. Below is my take on the ranger class, what I call the warden, for Swords & Wizardry Whitebox. The healing poultice skill means they make a fine replacement for the cleric, at least as party healer, for campaigns or parties without clerics.
The existing d6 hit dice and bonuses map well to OD&D, but they can be adapted to The S&W Core and Complete editions, as well as Labyrinth Lord – just change hit dice from d6 to d8, and the healing poultice ranges to the next higher die – from 1d4+1 to 1d6+1, for example. You can also bump up the bonuses a bit, e.g. changing +1 with bows to +2 or even +3. 
 
 
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The warden is a woodland protector and all-around expert in all things out-of-doors. They have the base skills of the fighter class (including the same saving throw and base hit bonus progressions), along with a few specialty skills that lend themselves to outdoor-themed campaigns, or even just as NPCs. In the latter case, they will typically patrol a large area of woodland that encompasses several small villages or towns, providing healing, protection from the more fearsome wooded creatures and even dispatching the occasional group of bandits. In return, the towns will give their warden access to any food, water, horses or other supplies they may need.
Warden Advancement
Level
Exp. Points
Hit Dice (d6)
Healing Poultice
1
0
1+4
1d4
2
2,250
2+3
1d4+1
3
4,500
3+2
1d6+1
4
9,000
4+1
1d6+3
5
18,000
5
1d8+3*
6
36,000
6
1d8+5
7
72,000
7
1d10+5
8
144,000
8
1d10+7
9
288,000
9
1d12+7
10
576,000
10
1d12+9
Wardens are quite hardy and have bonuses to their hit dice at levels 1-4. Thereafter they match fighters. This is in addition to any constitution bonuses. They get +2 to any saves vs. magic, death or poison. Humans and Elves can be Wardens, the latter are limited to 7th level.

Wardens get a 5% XP bonus if they have strength and constitution scores of 15 or above.

They are experts with the short or long bow, and get +1 to-hit with either, in addition to any other dexterity or racial bonuses they might have.

Wardens are experts in medicinal herbs. They can prepare healing poultices that will heal an increasing number of hit points based on the warden’s level (see table, above). These healing poultices can be used once per day, per PC. At the referee’s option, this can be in addition to any binding of wounds that may be allowed. At fifth level and above, the warden’s healing poultices act as a cleric’s cure disease spell.  The healing is relatively slow, however, taking 1d4 hours to cure disease or restore hit points. They can carry enough herbs and materials to make four such poultices, before having to forage for more raw materials.

Wardens are capable of living off the land, and in a suitable environment (access to water, plant life, small game) can live indefinitely. They are not fond of groups, however, and cannot provide for more than one or two others in such a fashion.

Wardens are not easily surprised. In their native outdoor environment, they will surprise foes generally on a 1-3/1d6, yet they themselves are surprised only on a 1/1d6.

Wardens are accomplished trackers. There are no specific rules to cover this, as success or failure will vary based on the terrain, weather, age of tracks and time of day. It is left up to the referees’ discretion, however in an ideal environment (non-rocky terrain, daylight, good weather, recent tracks), the track should always succeed.

Wardens are distrustful of certain forms of magic, and will not use potions or scrolls. They will, however, make use of any magical armor or weapons they come across.

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